A Place for the Book of the Gospels

Apart from No. 117 mentioned above, the Book of the Gospels is mentioned in some other numbers of the introduction to the Roman Missal.

Aug 28, 2014

Q: I would like to ask a question regarding the use of the Book of the Gospels, or Evangeliary. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM), No. 117, says: “On the altar itself may be placed the Book of the Gospels, distinct from the book of other readings, unless it is carried in the Entrance Procession.” Is it possible on some occasions to prepare the Book of the Gospels on a lectern, from the beginning of Mass, in some other part of the church — a side chapel, the church entrance or at the centre of the principal nave — and carry it from this place to the ambo at the moment of the Alleluia for proclamation? — G.N., Naples, Italy

A: Apart from No. 117 mentioned above, the Book of the Gospels is mentioned in some other numbers of the introduction to the Roman Missal. The principal ones are:

“44. Among gestures included are also actions and processions: of the priest going with the deacon and ministers to the altar; of the deacon carrying the Evangeliary or Book of the Gospels to the ambo before the proclamation of the Gospel ….

“60. The reading of the Gospel is the high point of the Liturgy of the Word. The Liturgy itself teaches that great reverence is to be shown to it by setting it off from the other readings with special marks of honour: whether the minister appointed to proclaim it prepares himself by a blessing or prayer; or the faithful, standing as they listen to it being read, through their acclamations acknowledge and confess Christ present and speaking to them; or the very marks of reverence are given to the Book of the Gospels.

“119. […] When there is an Entrance Procession, the following are also to be prepared: the Book of the Gospels ….

“120. Once the people have gathered, the priest and ministers, clad in the sacred vestments, go in procession to the altar in this order: […] A lector, [or deacon if present, GIRM, No. 172] who may carry the Book of the Gospels (though not the Lectionary), which should be slightly elevated” [see also GIRM, Nos. 194-195].

“122. […] It is a praiseworthy practice that the Book of the Gospels be placed upon the altar.

“133. If the Book of the Gospels is on the altar, the priest then takes it and goes to the ambo, carrying the Book of the Gospels slightly elevated and preceded by the lay ministers, who may carry the thurible and the candles. Those present turn towards the ambo as a sign of special reverence to the Gospel of Christ.

“173. When [the deacon] reaches the altar, if he is carrying the Book of the Gospels, he omits the sign of reverence and goes up to the altar. It is particularly appropriate that he should place the Book of the Gospels on the altar, after which, together with the priest, he venerates the altar with a kiss.

“175. […] Having bowed to the altar, he then takes up the Book of the Gospels which was placed upon it. He proceeds to the ambo, carrying the book slightly elevated. He is preceded by a thurifer, carrying a thurible with smoking incense, and by servers with lighted candles. […] When the deacon is assisting the Bishop, he carries the book to him to be kissed, or else kisses it himself, saying quietly, Per evangelica dicta (May the words of the gospel). In more solemn celebrations, as the occasion suggests, a Bishop may impart a blessing to the people with the Book of the Gospels. Lastly, the deacon may carry the Book of the Gospels to the credence table or to another appropriate and dignified place.”

Nos. 273 and 277 of the GIRM speak about the special veneration reserved for the Book of the Gospels by being kissed and incensed.

From these texts it is clear that the situation envisioned by our reader is not foreseen in the liturgical books. It is true that the norms say that placing the Book of the Gospels upon the altar is “praiseworthy” or “particularly appropriate,” which is not the language of strict obligation. However, the norms offer no alternative location, other than the ambo itself, for placing it, and this alternative implies leaving out the procession of the Evangeliary. --Answered by Legionary of Christ Fr Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy and dean of theology at the Regina Apostolorum university.

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