Food for thought

"The Eight Beatitudes are the provocative standard by which we measure every other vision of what fatherhood entails," writes Greg Popcak in his book "BeDADitudes: 8 Ways to Be an Awesome Dad."

Jun 15, 2017

"The Eight Beatitudes are the provocative standard by which we measure every other vision of what fatherhood entails," writes Greg Popcak in his book "BeDADitudes: 8 Ways to Be an Awesome Dad."

"When we practice the beatitudes in our fathering efforts, we seek to attain the utmost fullness of fatherhood by striving to become transparent, so that when our wives and children look at us, they see God's own loving face looking back at them," Popcak says.

In an article featured on the For Your Marriage website, Popcak discusses how to apply the beatitudes to the roles of father and husband:

-- Blessed are the dads who are poor in spirit. "Seek to be a father after the Father's own heart."

-- Blessed are the dads who mourn. "Empathize with you family's tears, fears and struggles."

-- Blessed are the dads who are meek. "Cultivate the humble strength of a listening heart."

-- Blessed are the dads who hunger and thirst for righteousness. "Awesome dads are on a mission from God. Live for him. Lead your family to him."

-- Blessed are the dads who are merciful. "Be a loving mentor in your home."

-- Blessed are the dads who are pure in heart. "Cherish the treasure of your wife and children."

-- Blessed are the dads who are peacemakers. "Keep your house in order. Prioritize your family. Protect the heart of your home."

-- Blessed are the dads who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness. "The world will try to undermine your effort to be an awesome dad. Be one anyway."

Read more at: http://www. foryourmarriage.org/the-bedaditudes- 8-ways-to-be-an-awesome- dad/

 

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Sunday Reflection

Twentieth Sunday of Ordinary Time: That woman is Ourselves

Mark calls her “a Greek” but Matthew uses the ancient name “Canaanite,” a reference to the original inhabitants of the Holy Land, who were conquered by the Israelites some twelve centuries before the time of Jesus. Matthew recognises that this encounter between the woman from the area of Tyre and Sidon and Jesus is about an outsider “wanting in.” So he heightens the drama by identifying her as a member of that group of pagans who were Israel’s first enemies (after the Egyptians, of course).