There’s more to it than just passing through the Holy Door

In this Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy, I have observed many church groups, and individual parishioners, taking time and making the effort to organise pilgrimages to the churches with designated Holy Doors of Mercy, to encounter and experience the love and mercy of God.

Mar 11, 2016

Dear Editor,
In this Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy, I have observed many church groups, and individual parishioners, taking time and making the effort to organise pilgrimages to the churches with designated Holy Doors of Mercy, to encounter and experience the love and mercy of God.

This is indeed admirable and commendable.

But I wonder about the ‘after effects’ of such pilgrimages. (Maybe your team could send people to find out if there are any?) You see, I gather from the Gospels I have read that all who are touched by God’s mercy and love, take action to reach out others. For example:

-- Peter’s mother in law — after being healed of fever, got up and served Jesus and the apostles
-- the woman with a bad reputation — Jesus said she has been forgiven much (experienced God’s mercy) that is why she showed such great love as to shed tears on Jesus’ feet, wipe them with her hair and kiss them at a Pharisees’ party.
-- the Gerasene demoniac — after he was healed, he wanted to follow Jesus but was instructed to spread the good news of God’s mercy among his own people, and he did.
--blind Bartimaeus — who followed Jesus along the way to Jerusalem after he regained his sight.

So, while it is fantastic that there are pilgrimages to visit the churches and enter the Holy Doors of Mercy, I feel there is a similar need to advance another step and be the face of God’s mercy to people who need it most. Maybe after the pilgrimages to the churches, the Dioceses would encourage the pilgrims to organise trips to visit and spend time with

— the elderly in nursing homes,
— the children in the cancer ward,
— the patients suffering from AIDS
— Environmental Protection and Nature Preservation Agencies (maybe organise talks or exhibitions to increase awareness among the church goers)
— Soup Kitchens to feed the poor and homeless
— The Society of St Vincent de Paul to assist in the distribution of food and clothing.
— and the like.

The Arch/Dioceses themselves could also encourage the parishes to announce the names of the recently deceased brothers and sisters in the respective parishes during the Saturday/ Sunday Eucharistic celebrations so that everyone could pray for their souls and the grieving families (as spiritual works of mercy).

As I mentioned earlier, I am just sharing my musings. I feel that, during the Holy Year of Mercy, rather than ‘resting on my laurels’ after passing through the Door of Mercy, there is so much more that needs to be done to bring the mercy and love of God to the world and, what better time than now to do it.

Paraphrasing the words of St Paul in 2 Cor 6:2, “Now is the favourable time; this is the day of salvation.” Thank you and God Bless.

S.C. Chan
Via Email

Total Comments:0

Name
Email
Comments