Why move the Blessed Sacrament to a hall?

Since the 60s, we have been visiting the churches to venerate the Blessed Sacrament which is usually placed in one of the side altars of the church after the Holy Thursday Mass.

May 15, 2015

Dear Editor,
Since the 60s, we have been visiting the churches to venerate the Blessed Sacrament which is usually placed in one of the side altars of the church after the Holy Thursday Mass. Then, due to the renovation of St Anthony’s Church, the Blessed Sacrament was placed in a hall until this year, when it was back in the church.

Fatima Church in Brickfields also did the same by placing the Blessed Sacrament in a hall at the back of the church. This year, Holy Rosary Church has, for the first time in history, moved the Blessed Sacrament to the hall at the back of the church.

I am not quite sure what the rationale is in moving the Blessed Sacrament to a hall outside the church and I would be grateful for your advice.

Tracy Lim
via Email

EDITOR’S NOTE:
The Ordo states that it is fitting that for the reservation of the Eucharist to serve for communion tomorrow (Good Friday), a chapel should be arranged in which prayer and meditation may be fostered, but it is also highly recommended that all be marked by that austerity which is appropriate to these days.

If the Blessed Sacrament is normally reserved in a chapel separate from the central nave of the church, the place of reposition and of adoration may suitably be set up there.

The Blessed Sacrament should be reserved, however, in a closed tabernacle, exposition in a monstrance being absolutely excluded. Nor should the tabernacle in any way have the appearance of a tomb, and the term “tomb” or “sepulchre” should be avoided, since the chapel of reservation is not intended to represent the Lord’s tomb, but only to reserve the Blessed Sacrament for communion the next day. -- Ordo 2014-2015 pg 40.

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