Cardinal Bo: Radio Veritas can become Asia's missionary

Cardinal Charles Bo, president of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC), has called for Radio Veritas Asia (RVA) to be the missionary of Asia as he presided over a thanksgiving Mass for the launch of the RVA mobile app.

Oct 12, 2021


YANGON:
Cardinal Charles Bo, president of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC), has called for Radio Veritas Asia (RVA) to be the missionary of Asia as he presided over a thanksgiving Mass for the launch of the RVA mobile app.

“The Lord gives us apostolic missions and his grace. Like Paul, we need conviction to go out in spite of the challenges and problems. May RVA truly become the missionary of Asia, the voice of Asian Christianity, and may everyone who is involved be blessed,” he said in a homily for the Mass held at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Yangon on Oct. 11.

“The Lord chooses us to proclaim the Gospel in Asia so that the people of the vast continent and Asians all over the world may hear it through our missionary endeavor. May the people of Asia, rich in their cultures and religions, come to listen and recognize the true signs of Christ who lives among us, who speaks to us through his words and his sacraments.

“I invite all those bishops, priests, religious and laity to download this mobile app for spiritual companionship and to use this effective means of sharing the Gospel and pastoral care. The mobile application is a pastoral application of new technology and to enable the people of God to hear the Good News.” 

Cardinal Bo also highlighted the important role of Pope John XXIII as Oct. 11 marked the memorial of the late pontiff, the inspiration behind RVA. During his pontificate, RVA and FABC came into existence.

He hailed Pope John XXIII as “the messenger of peace, joy and pastoral zeal."

“We pray that we draw inspiration from him to become deeply committed to our call to proclaim the Gospel,” Cardinal Bo said.

The outspoken Myanmar cardinal also prayed for all the people of Asia, particularly the poor, migrants and victims of war, oppression and poverty.

RVA started as a shortwave radio station under the guidance of the Office of Social Communication of the FABC, the collegial body of Catholic bishops in Asia. One of its primary objectives was to offer a platform on the airwaves for “voiceless people” in communist and military-ruled Asian countries including China, Vietnam, North Korea and Myanmar.

Pope John Paul II visited the RVA offices in 1981 and called the station the “voice of Asian Christianity.” In 1995, when RVA marked 25 years of broadcasting, the pope called it the “missionary of Asia.”

Since 2011 many partners have withdrawn funding and Catholic churches in respective countries have been financing RVA language services.

The radio station was digitized in 2017, a significant move that saves about US$1.6 million in annual costs.--ucanews.com

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