Editor’s Note

Someone recently mentioned that it’s only natural for people to seek self-glorification. The message implied was that, when people talk about their work, it’s because they want recognition. They want to be acknowledged for their hard work, contribution and capability.

Apr 01, 2022


By Patricia Pereira
Someone recently mentioned that it’s only natural for people to seek self-glorification. The message implied was that, when people talk about their work, it’s because they want recognition. They want to be acknowledged for their hard work, contribution and capability.

‘Self-glorification’ may seem too harsh a term. I think it’s only natural for us to want some form of gratitude. There is no harm in accepting credit where credit is due and yes, occasionally, we do like our egos stroked. At the same time, we have to keep ourselves grounded. In the words of the late Steve Jobs, “We need to be on guard against arrogance, which knocks at the door whenever you're successful.”

If ever there was an epitome of humility, then we need look no further than the life and times of the late Anthony Soter Cardinal Fernandez (Keeping alive the legacy of Cardinal Soter – Pg 1).

From hospital assistant, to priest, to bishop, to archbishop and, finally, cardinal, he never forgot his humble beginnings and it was this endearing nature that enabled him to be both a servant of God and prince of the Church.

In 2017, during the thanksgiving Mass to mark his appointment as cardinal, he uttered these words in all simplicity, “To all of you, I wish to remain just Soter, without any titles.” Anyone who has had the privilege of knowing the late cardinal will certainly attest to this, as evidenced by the hundreds of tributes posted on social media when he passed away in October 2020. The messages and anecdotes affirmed a resonating appellation to him as a man who always embraced meekness rather than the high office of power and authority. He propounded the concept of servant leadership and ‘walked the talk’ himself.

Though often shying from the limelight, Cardinal Soter never shied away from his responsibilities or from his role as a kindly shepherd and fatherly figure, as aptly described by a member of the Presbyterium … “Small in stature yet assertive in presence, unafraid to stand up for a just cause but always ready to back down if reconciliation was attained, quick to reprimand when things went wrong, but never far from putting his hands around the shoulder of someone in pain.”
The late cardinal often listened more than he spoke. He propounded the concept of saying less of ‘I’ and more of ‘you’. Sometimes, humility means not speaking at all. Humble is the person who remains silent while others vie to be heard in self-glorification.

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