Pope Francis supports food entitlement

Pope Francis in his Address to Participants in the 39th Session of the FAO at the Vatican’s Clementine Hall hoped that the Member States will operate following the inspiration that the right to food can be guaranteed if only we take care of the real subject — the man who suffers the effects of hunger and undernourishment.

Jul 31, 2015

Pope Francis in his Address to Participants in the 39th Session of the FAO (UN Food and Agriculture Organization) at the Vatican’s Clementine Hall hoped that the Member States will operate following the inspiration that the right to food can be guaranteed if only we take care of the real subject — the man who suffers the effects of hunger and undernourishment. The real subject!

The year 2015, could be a very particular and meaningful year to reach this objective due to three relevant international events like the European Year for the development, Milan’s Universal Exposition, and the definition of the new sustainable development objectives.

The food entitlement should be one of the fundamental issues of the new development Agenda with which the UN will define the new millennium goals, this is the fundamental issue — respond to the imperative that access to necessary nutrition is a right of all.

Francis underlines that if poverty in one country is a social problem to which solutions can be found in other contexts it is a structural problem where beyond social policies it is necessary to address it putting back solidarity at the heart of international relations, moving it from vocabulary to policy options: “the politics of the other”.

Sen in the occasion of the two Milan conferences expressed, once more, that it is necessary to broader our understanding about how the causations are causally connected, the various implications, to be able to control, to curb and ultimately eliminate the scourge of hunger in the world.

It is all about connecting the various elements “without stopping at the slogans”, Sen says, on the other hand understand the role that economic issues, health and social protection net systems have, and the importance that political choices represent in endemic hunger and intermittent famine in our contemporary world.

And again the political system, in a functioning Democracy a government is too much under scrutiny and criticism and therefore it is possible to take action to stop policies which ultimately may lead to the development of famine, citizen can demand attention and extra income measures, for example, in order to tackle potentially serious situation of risk.

The idea of entitlements opens up the door to many areas of concerns, and connects a variety of complex interconnected factors.

At the question, then, making a link with the many issues we do encounter today in the world, about what are the instruments or the ways that citizens have at their disposal to generate a greater level of attention and political action regarding the themes like sustainability, growing inequalities. Amartya Sen answers that the way to do this is certainly by “speaking up” and “letting our voice be heard” as there is no other way to be heard than “demand attention”.

“Only if people — citizens together — demand attention then the power of reasoning, public debate and mobilization can become important”.

When talking on Pope Francis, we can conclude with Sen’s words: “I would say that He is the only person who is in a recognized position of authority and who is thinking about issues regarding Humanity”, this make of course the difference in this world, but it is not necessary to be religious or Catholic... because Francis in doing so represents not only the Head of the Catholic Church, but He is the Head who speaks for Humanity in the sense that He acts in a way to get people thinking on these issues”.

“So there is no formula for doing it other than demanding attention and let our voice be heard, if you are hopefully in a relevant position of course the result will come more easily otherwise it will be necessary get together, to let our voice be heard”. -- Vatican Insider

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